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. testified about the attack thon u.s. consulate in benghazi, libarch that killed ambassador stevens and three other americans. the pentagon never received the request from the state academy for security, and did not have the resources to get support on the ground in time to thwart the attackers. leon panetta is stepping down. this hearing is four hours and 15 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. today the committee welcomes secretary of defense, leon panetta, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey. to testify about the department of defense's response the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya, last year. and the findings of its internal review following that attack, including lessons learned from benghazi. we will be receiving testimony next tuesday morning on the impact of sequestration and/or a full-year continuing resolution on the department of defense witnesses. there will be department secretary of defense, the comp driller and the joint chiefs of staff. i hope
heightened security risk. and i think it's time for us to do a check on whether or not we should in fact be relying on in that local militia were contractors. >> senator, let me just commend you for the work you've been doing with regards to these kind of contract and the quality of individuals that are involved. .. to do what is inherit a government function. it's almost like a hit brick wall every i time talk about this. why is it it has to be a contract function. why can't we use the best trained military in the world to protect our most valued assets in our most dangerous places? >> i mean, i think the reality just speaking with regards to my old agency we are deployed in so many areas you can't expect the military to pop up there and provide that kind of protection. they have to get security on side and get from the very best people they can contract with. that's become the reality we're dealing with. >> because the need to integrate to the community and therefore if you have military it stands out. i can see that particularly under the intelligence agency. for embassies, it
to be commander u.s. central command and general david rodriguez u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. these two combatant commands centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for our military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. oath nominees have served our country with distinction and i want to thank each of you for your decades of military service and your willingness to serve once again. i understand that general austin 's wife charlene and general rodriguez' wife jen air with us this morning and i want to a knowledge them and thank them for their sacrifices, their support to our nominees throughout the years which is so essential to the success of our nominees and as is the committee's tradition are nominees are invited to introduce any family members or friends who may be with them this morning with their opening remarks. if confirmed general austin will assume command of centcom during it critical transition. not for military operations in afghanistan. in the coming months afghan forces will assume the lead responsibility for providing
are talking about the divisions that cause people to start thinking like enemies, still very much with us. [applause] >> i want to thank taylor branch for being with us tonight. he will be signing books in the library. i want to thank the livingston foundation for sponsoring this lecture and it anybody in california is listening please -- we could really use it. thank you very much. [applause] >> for more information visit the author's website taylor branch.com. >> to take booktv is in savannah, ga. for live coverage of the savannah book festival starting at 10:15 eastern with nobel prize winner and former vice president al gore on the future. 11:thirty-fourth and eighty psychologist heidi squire craft on rule number 2, lessons i've learned in a combat hospital. at 1:30 cnn's chief washington correspondent jake tamper on the war in afghanistan from the outpost. 2:45 presidential historian kevin thomas on ike's glove. at 4:00 pillage a prize-winning historian gerri willis asks why priests. the savannah book festival part of three days of booktv this president's day weekend on c-span2. >> n
us is it's not university our grassroots are companies but it sort of building networks that can carry innovation for spill my experience in corporate life is that there are strange people. not academic setting. >> you mentioned in our companies investing more in automation and not in early stage creative research. if you look at u.s. manufacturing, capital stock which is a reflection of basically how many machines, including 3-d printers, machines defined -- defined broadly, pretty much that used to grow every decade in america on the order of 25-55% a decade. our technology stock in manufacturing was doubled it in the 2000s it was zero essentially. which has never again happen in our history. the u.s. companies were not investing in automation initiatives. and secondly, we have this in her recent book, if you look at the share of corporate r&d as applied, excuse because basic, applied in development, we are the only industrial nation where the share of the corporate share in basic and applied to shrink in the last decade. every other country is expand their basic and applied fo
. and this morning he's going to talk to us about his latest, "invisible armies." with that, turn it over to you, max. [applause] >> thank you very much, steve, for that warm and generous introduction, and thank you also for your many years of service, and i see a lot of folks who are either current and active duty or retired military, and i thank all of you for your years of service to the nation. what i'm here to talk about today is the contents of my new book, which as steve mentioned, is a history of ger guerrilla warfare. and although it may seem thick and daunting at first glance, i did try to tell a good story. it sort of encapsulated 5,000 years of guerrilla warfare history into one book. now, that may seem like a formidable undertaking, but here today in front of your very eyes, i'm going to do something that is even harder; i'm going to try to encapsulate the entire book into about a 25-minute talk. [laughter] so that's going to work out to about 200 years per minute. sofassen your -- sofassen your seat belts, we're going to go on a historical journey here. i'm going to talk about the origi
>> please let us know about book fairs and festivals in your area, and we'll add them to our list. post them to our wall at facebook.com/booktv or e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. >>> and now on booktv, ben shapiro contends that liberals are guilty of bullying their opposition and creating an environment that discourages political debate. this heritage foundation event is a little under an hour. [applause] >> it's always a pleasure to be here: i'm a huge fan of heritage foundation, everything that they do, actually. they were the first outlet to pick up my syndicated column. i do have a fourth book before "bullies," i spoke here at heritage for that too. i'm also the editor at large of breitbart news, so if you're bored or have an ipad, you can tune in at 870.com. i want to start by talking about andrew breitbart. andrew was a mentor of mine. i met andrew when i was 17 years old. he had just seen a column i wrote for the ucla daily bruin, and he was sitting in a greasy taco joint, saw the column and then promptly e-mailed me. at the time, andrew was just the secret other half of th
about how the project is crucial to u.s. energy security. working with canada for our energy rather than getting it from the middle east. the letter talks about thousands of jobs at the -- that the project creates, not only building this $7 billion pipeline but that all the jobs that go to the refineries and the other activities that go with it and talks about safety, efficiency and reliability. now, the letter concludes mr. president, we consider the keystone x.l. pipeline fundamentally important to the future economic prosperity of both the united states and canada. we strongly urge you to issue a presidential permit and act swiftly to approve the keystone x.l. pipeline, signed by governors -- now, remember, senator baucus and i have been working on the effort on behalf of montana. you have got nebraska here. governor heineman just sent a letter in. now here are some of the other governors on this letter. sam brownback from kansas, the governors of north dakota and south dakota, governor mary fallon from oklahoma, governor rick perry from texas. in addition to other governors that aren
commander of u.s. forces in iraq general loy austin to lead the command which is responsible for operations of middle east and afghanistan. general austin was joined by u.s. command nominee general david rodriguez who is a top commander in afghanistan from 2007 to 2011. this hearing is chaired by carl levin of michigan. it is two hours. >> good morning everybody and welcome this morning that committee considers the nomination of two very distinguished officers to the two of the most active and challenging combatant commands. general lloyd austin united states army nominated to the commander u.s. central command, and general david rodriquez, u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. fees' to combat and commands, centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for the military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. both nominees have served the country with distinction, and i want to faint each of you for your decades of military service and a willingness to serve once again. i and stand general austin's life and rodriguez's life are with us this morning.
panetta said it would be irresponsible for the congress to allow it to happen. many of us agree, it must be avoided. but apart from that challenge in the next month, or series of months, the long-term outlook for the department of defense is that it must do more with less, and secretary hagel, if he is confirmed, will have that management task, and he is one of the people in this country who is almost uniquely qualified to carry it out. and i believe that he will with great distinction. he will take care of our men and women in uniform and strengthen our national defense, he will do what he thinks is right even if it's not popular, and he is, finally, as everyone has said, a good and decent man. i thank in particular senator mccain for his very compelling and telling comment during our consideration before the vote in the armed services committee. he said -- and i agree -- no one should impugn chuck hagel's character. he's a person of integrity and character. and i believe that he will have the respect at all levels of our defense, men and women who serve and sacrifice every day, men and
certainly regards israel as a true and natural u.s. ally." in another quote, he said, "i know hagel personally. i think he believes in the relationship and the natural partnership between israel and the united states." here is an israeli patriot who has spent a great deal of time devoted to the relationship with the united states of israel who understand, in his words, and concludes that chuck hagel regards israel as a true and natural u.s. ally and will act accordingly. he is a dedicated patriot. he is an individual who has served this country in so many different ways and i support his nomination, urge my colleagues to do the same. i think, too, it's important to state that this nomination, as we've done with every secretary of defense for decades, deserves an up-or-down vote on the floor of the united states senate. people may choose to cast a vote against him for many reasons. that's the prerogative of a senator. but i strongly believe that if we want to stay true to the traditions of this body and to the presumption that the president should be at least allowed to have his nomi
was called. the question was, do 60 of us believe that it's time to end debate on the nomination of the president to be secretary of defense, the leader of the largest military organization in the world, the largest employer in the united states, and the senate armed services committee has reported that recommendation to the senate two days ago? not ten days ago, not 15 days ago, not 30 days ago -- two days ago. now, most of us aren't on the armed services committee. are we not entitled -- are we not entitled to have more than two days to consider one of the most important nominations the president has to make without having the distinguished majority leader accuse us of a filibuster? i mean, what we do in this body is debate. we debate issues. and in addition to that, there are a number of people on the republican side have asked for information for which they haven't received answers yet. now, in every one of those cases, those are not requests that i'm interested in. they won't produce answers that i need to know. they may be outside the range of questions that i think ought t
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12